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A GROUP WEBLOG FOR TEXT AND MEDIUM: THEORY OF THE BOOK AND THE FUTURE OF READING ENG 577.

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February 20, 2009

McLuhan: speech as the content of phonetic writing?


Do you think McL would deny that there's a necessary loss in the translation from speech to writing? Since his fundamental argument is that the medium shapes (ok, is) the message, doesn't it follow that a translation from medium to medium is going to involve subtractions (or let's say losses--though sometimes the losses can feel like gains, as when we lose the distracting bad breath and tics of a speaking person) and additions (which we can call gains, though they may not be felt or valued as gains, etc.)?
Posted by      Morris E. at 3:08 PM EST

Comments:

  Wesley M.  says:
Oh, I have no doubt that he knows this. I was only commenting on the interesting equation that he sets up. (I love to mix math and reading.) I think that, perhaps what happened in this case was that McLuhan might have taken for granted that we all would understand that things get lost in travel from one medium to another. And I think that we all do know that. I was just using this "word equation" to bring attention to this fact.
Posted on Fri, 20 Feb 2009 3:59 PM EST by Wesley M.
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