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October 24, 2011

Caught in a Lie: The Role of the Brain in Detecting Deception


Vital to everyday social and economic interactions is the ability to accurately discern whether other individuals are being honest or deceitful. While recognizing dishonesty is no easy matter, it is nonetheless possible even in the absence of signals from facial expression, through careful attention to nonverbal cues. Researcher Julie Gr├Ęzes and her colleagues have identified the brain mechanisms that underlie detection of deceptive intent through the use of fMRI technology.

The study involved imaging 11 participants as they viewed videos of actors with blurred faces lifting boxes, and evaluated whether the actors were attempting to deceive them regarding the weight of the box. The results from this experiment were compared to the results from a previous study in which participants were asked to judge whether actors' expectations of a box's weight were false. The key contrasting variable was the judgment of of deceptive intent in the current study, versus the judgment of a false belief resulting in accidental deception in the previous study.

Their research concluded that the amygdala and rostral anterior cingulate cortex were both significantly activated when the participants judged the actors as being intentionally deceptive, yet not when the actors were judged to have unknowingly erroneous beliefs that led to accidental deception.

The amygdala is known to be a critical aspect of the neural circuitry concerning emotion and value appraisal. Additionally, the anterior cingulate cortex is activated when there is intent to directly communicate with the participant, indicated by eye contact and use of the participant's name. Based on such, the researchers speculate that activation of the amygdala and anterior cingulate cortex may be suggestive of the observers' valuation of social intentions towards themselves, and could thereby reflect an emotional response to being misled.

Whether activated by an internal sense of fairness or rather an assessment of social intention, the amygdala and rostral anterior cingulate cortex are working together to help catch liars everywhere, red handed.

The original paper can be viewed at: http://www.jneurosci.org/content/24/24/5500.full?sid=4dc151cf-6709-4dae-b031-69ba24dc61c4
Posted by      Anjali C. at 12:00 AM MDT

Comments:

  Gino C.  says:
Interesting Anjali,
I find this article to be very intuitive. I question if the concept of deception is an evolved basic instinct. The Amygdala and and rostral anterior cingulate cortex both are triggered in basic survival based learning. The dorsal and rostral areas of the ACC both seem to be affected by rewards and losses associated with errors. The rostral ACC seems to be active after an error commission, indicating an error response function.

While the Amygdala, as part of the limbic system, deals with emotional learing, memory modulation, and social interaction. In regards to social interaction, The amygdala volume correlates positively with both the size (the number of contacts a person has) and the complexity (the number of different groups to which a person belongs) of social networks. Individuals with larger amygdalae had larger and more complex social networks. These people were also better able to make accurate social judgments about other persons' faces. It is hypothesized that larger amygdalae allow for greater emotional intelligence, enabling greater societal integration and cooperation with others. Can Deception be a survival interpretation of where or not we see a stimuli/person as threatening or benefiting? I wonder using the basic parameters, if animals can detect deception.

The amygdala processes reactions to violations concerning personal space. These reactions are absent in persons in whom the amygdala is damaged bilaterally.[42] Furthermore, the amygdala is found to be activated in fMRI when people observe that others are physically close to them, such as when a person being scanned knows that an experimenter is standing immediately next to the scanner, versus standing at a distance
Posted on Fri, 28 Oct 2011 12:02 PM MDT by Gino C.
  Nathan J.  says:
Well, lying is human nature. However, there are lies that are punishable by law such as scams and fraudulent activities. Even lying to police is a criminal offence. Sydney criminal lawyers
Posted on Wed, 4 Mar 2020 10:37 PM MST by Nathan J.
  leona m.  says:
In this blog, they always try to add new articles that according to the audience interest. I mostly prefer detective articles and horror cbd usage stories. Caught in a lie is an amazing article and I found it very interesting too.
Posted on Tue, 19 May 2020 3:53 AM MDT by leona m.

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